WRITING AS DRAWING AND DRAWING AS WRITING

FORM OF EXPRESSION : EXERCISE

Purpose

TO BECOME A BETTER CARTOPOLOGIST

TO KNOW MORE ABOUT CARTOPOLOGY

Expected from you

spirit of initiative

performativity and interacton

Degree of complexity

TO EXPECT FROM THE FORM OF EXPRESSION

 To experience drawing as a tool that will allow you to become a more sensitive observer and researcher.

CONTEXT

In the book ‘The Thinking Hand’¹, Juhani Pallasmaa talks about the potential of the human hand. He explains how the pen in the hand becomes a bridge between the imagining mind and the emerging image. Referring to Pallasmaa, the architect Glenn Murcutt2 explains that it is ‘the hand what develops our mind’. Now, I wonder, how much of this is true for a writer and how much is true for a drawer? Murcutt continues with: ‘The idea of drawing is that you sometimes wonder how this happened.’ But I have to say, as a cartopologist whose main craft is drawing, I sometimes find myself wondering the same when I write. This differentiation, between drawing and writing, does not seem to part of Pallasmaa’s practice: ‘I write in the same manner and with the same intentions as I sketch and draw, open-mindedly and without preconceptions or pre-set ideas. The words arise in the same manner as the lines of a drawing unfold’.3 Where I follow Pallasmaa on the open-mindedly and without preconceptions, in my drawing and writing practice lines and words do not unfold in the same manner. But what about your practice? 

The exercise below stresses on the craft of drawing and writing, questions and attempts to make you more aware of the impact of drawing and writing while executing it. Do writing and drawing make you think differently? Do they sensitise you to different things? Do they generate a different mindset to observe and document your thoughts? Or maybe you are more a Pallasmaa kind of drawer and writer, and do not sense the difference in such a way? Let us try to find out in practice. 

The exercise we will start up is merely an introduction and only scratches the surface of the topic. Writing and drawing can and should be treated with more care. There are plenty of styles and reasons to draw and write. However, the purpose of this exercise is only to make you more sensitive to the topic through practice. 

Please add the exercise to your cahier to retrieve the instructions and needed material. Good luck!

REFERECES

1.
Juhani Pallasmaa, The Thinking Hand Existential and Embodied Wisdom in Architecture (New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc, 2009)

2.
Summary of a lecture by Glenn Murcutt in University of New South Wales (2011), accessed Janu-ary 30, 2021, https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=5cETyaK6AaA

3.
Juhani Pallasmaa. The Eyes of the Skin (New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc, 2012) p 124 

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